Cyveillance, Still Leaving a Trail–Who Pays These Guys?

If I was paying money to monitor those who I may perceive as a threat (my husband does have Multiple Sclerosis and I am a health care activist and I guess that does make us scary threatening to some) I would hope that those I pay have some, what’s the word–subtlety.

From my handy Statcounter:

Cox Communications (70.184.193.254)   0 returning visits
United States FlagSpringfield, Virginia, United States
(No referring link)
18 Apr 14:10:55

 

For those of you not familiar with Cyveillance, they monitor websites; more details below from Wikipedia. They were a big visitor to Illness and Insurance Hell all during 2009 when President Obama was trying to pass health care reform.

From Wikipedia:
Cyveillance

Cyveillance, founded in 1997, is a private Internet-monitoring company based in Arlington, Virginia and provides an intelligence-led approach to security. The company’s subscription-based product, the Cyveillance Intelligence Center, is a hosted solution. Companies hire Cyveillance to monitor for Internet risks such as: Information leaks; Phishing and malware attacks and other online fraud schemes; Sale of stolen credit and debit card numbers; Threats to executives and events; Counterfeiting; and Trademark and brand abuse.
Cyveillance was bought in May 2009 by the UK firm QinetiQ, for an initial cash consideration of $40 million.[1] Cyveillance’s clients include the pharmaceutical industry and entities within the entertainment industry, particularly music and movie concerns, specifically, the RIAA and MPAA. Cyveillance runs scans which attempt to gain unauthorized access to P2P networks, Web servers, IRC servers, FTP servers, and mail servers, searching for mp3 audio files and movie titles. After running the scan, the site scanned is archived, and the information sold to the RIAA and/or MPAA.[citation needed]

And more about Cyveillance directly from their website here.

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